Common TIG Welding Errors and TIG Troubleshooting Guide

The welding machine is an electronic device, in the process of use certainly no electronic device can avoid all problems and failures. Moreover, incorrect welding techniques or some omission/redundancy also create bad welds. This article will provide TIG Troubleshooting Guide for you to understand and find a quick solution.

For simple errors, users can fix them on the spot without having to send the welding machine for warranty or repair. Therefore, users should understand the basic problems, causes, and ways to fix problems when TIG welding to limit the impact on their work.

Here are some common problems that can occur when TIG welding, along with some suggestions for troubleshooting:

Common Problems and TIG Troubleshooting Guide

Poor fusion

Reason: This can be caused by many factors, including incorrect torch angle, incorrect size or type of tungsten, and incorrect filler metal. Furthermore, any contaminant in the weld area can cause poor fusion. In addition, incorrect or inadequate shielding gas can also cause poor fusion.

Solution: To troubleshoot poor fusion, make sure you’re using the correct torch angle, tungsten size and type, and filler metal for the material you’re welding, and ensure that the weld area is clean and you’re using the correct shielding gas.

Porosity

Reason: Porosity, or small holes or voids in the weld, can be caused by a variety of factors, including: contaminants in the weld area, incorrect shielding gas or incorrect filler metal. In addition, improper welding technique, such as welding the torch too much or moving too slowly, can also cause porosity.

Solution: To troubleshoot porosity, make sure the weld area is clean and free of contaminants, use the correct shielding gas and filler metal for the material you’re welding, and focus on proper technique.

Porosity
Porosity

Lack of penetration

Reason: This can be caused by many factors, including incorrect torch angle, incorrect size or type of tungsten, or incorrect filler metal. Shielding gas problems can also cause poor penetration. Furthermore, improper welding technique can also cause lack of penetration.

Solution: To troubleshoot lack of penetration, make sure you’re using the correct torch angle, tungsten size and type, and filler metal for the material you’re welding, and ensure that you’re using the correct shielding gas and practicing proper technique.

Excessive spatter

Reason: Excessive spatter, or the presence of small droplets of molten metal on the surface of the weld can be caused by a variety of factors, including incorrect current or voltage settings, or using a filler metal with too much flux. Some filler metals, particularly those with a higher flux content, can cause excessive spatter.

Solution: To troubleshoot excessive spatter, check your current and voltage settings and make sure they’re appropriate for the material you’re welding, consider using a filler metal with less flux, and focus on proper technique.

Excessive spatter
Excessive spatter

Distortion

Reason: Distortion, or the warping or deformation of the workpiece or weld joint, can be caused by a variety of factors, including: too much heat input, too much restraint on the part, incorrect preheat or interpass temperature. Different materials have different preheat and interpass temperature requirements. If these temperatures are not followed, it can cause distortion.

Solution: To troubleshoot, make sure you’re using the right preheat and interpass temperatures for the material you’re welding, and try to minimize restraint on the part as much as possible.

Tungsten contamination

Reason: Tungsten contamination can be caused by a variety of factors, including: using the tungsten electrode to strike an arc or clean the weld pool, or using it too long. If the tungsten electrode is used for too long, it can become contaminated with oxide build-up.

Solution: To prevent tungsten contamination, be sure not to use the tungsten electrode to strike an arc or clean the weld pool, replace the tungsten electrode when necessary, and store the tungsten electrode in a clean, dry place. If the tungsten electrode becomes contaminated, it should be replaced.

Tungsten contamination
Tungsten contamination

Crater cracks

Reason: Crater cracks are cracks that form at the end of a weld in the crater, or depression, left by the molten metal. They can be caused by a variety of factors, including: improper current or voltage settings, improper shielding gas flow, incorrect filler metal, improper technique.

Solution: To prevent crater cracks, make sure you’re using the correct current and voltage settings, ensure that the shielding gas flow is sufficient, use the correct filler metal, and focus on proper technique.

Frequently asked questions (Weld FAQ)

What are some common problems that can occur when TIG welding?

Some common problems that can occur when TIG welding include poor fusion, porosity, lack of penetration, excessive spatter, distortion, tungsten contamination, crater cracks, undercut, overlap, and lack of fusion in welded joints.

What is the cause of distortion when TIG welding?

Distortion can be caused by too much heat input, incorrect preheat or interpass temperature, and too much restraint on the part being welded.

What are the disadvantages of TIG welding?

Some disadvantages of TIG welding include the need for a constant flow of shielding gas, the need for a constant power source, and the slower weld speed compared to other welding processes.

Conclusion

Above is the TIG Troubleshooting Guide that weldfaq has provided. We hope that through this article, you can grasp the causes of problems and know how to fix them quickly and effectively. To become a professional welder, it takes practice and more effort. By then, these problems may or may not have occurred because you are already an expert!

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